Saturday, September 26, 2015

Using Classkick in the High School Math Classroom



Do you integrate technology into your classroom?  Are you a 1:1 iPad school?  If yes, do you wish you could find an app for your students to use that caused them to say, "I love this app!" And "Can we use this app every day?"



Let me tell you about the app Classkick.  When using this app, you can see everything your students are doing on their iPad in real time.  You can give them feedback in real time.  Best of all, you can give them a virtual sticker if they get the problem correct!

Here is a screenshot of a problem I gave to my calculus class recently.



Notice the problem is right in the Classkick app.  I typed the directions in the app and then imported a picture of a problem I wanted the students to do.  [note: there is no equation editor in Classkick as of yet.]

Here is a screenshot of one of my students' work that he did right on the iPad.



Here is a screenshot of the sticker he got when he got the problem right and you can see where I wrote Good on his work.


After briefly being creeped out when they realized I could see exactly what they were doing, my class worked diligently on the three problems I gave them.  I know it sounds completely unbelievable, but the all worked and were completely engaged.  They all wanted my attention RIGHT NOW,

The best part for me was that I could correct errors as they were happening.  Kids could ask me a question virtually and no one else had to know.  I could tell immediately who still needed practice.  It was great 😀

Beware: Once you turn the students loose with this app, their answers will come quickly and you need to be ready.  Once someone gets a message from you, or a sticker, they will all be calling out for you!   Classkick provides a feature so that students can virtually raise their hand for help or ask you to check their work.  They can also ask another student for help...however I haven't experimented with that feature yet because I was a little worried about what one student might write on another students' screen.  Depending on your class, this might be a great feature for you.

If you are interested in learning more about Classkick, here is a link to their website:  Classkick

[One thing I forgot to mention...Classkick is ABSOLUTELY FREE and students join your class by entering a class code...no user names or passwords to remember!]

Saturday, September 12, 2015

Snippets of Video on You Tube for High School Math




This post will be a compilation of video snippets I find on You Tube or other places online that are helpful in introducing or teaching high school math.  These are not Khan Academy type videos - they are fun snippets that you can insert in your lessons when a laugh is necessary :)

1) Introducing Proof - How to Prove a Mathematical Theory - by Scott Kennedy for Ted Ed - 4:38

2) Volume of a Cylinder - Phineas and Ferb - 0:15 - Phineas and Ferb discuss the formula for finding the volume of a jar of jellybeans.

3) Pythagorean Theorem - Simpsons on the Pythagorean Theorem - 0:08 - Homer states the Theorem incorrectly.

4) Vectors - Vector from Despicable Me - 0:59 - Vector introduces himself to Gru

5) Newton vs. Leibniz - Merry Newtonmas - 1:09 - Big Bang Theory - Sheldon wants to hang a Newton ornament on the tree.

6) Crickets Chirping - The Jiminy Conjecture - 2:47 - Big Bang Theory - Sheldon counts the number of chirps of a cricket and is able to determine the type of cricket.

7) Speed and Velocity - They Might be Giants - Speed and Velocity - 1:50 - from They Might be Giants - cute video and song that will be stuck in your head :)

8) Newton vs. Leibniz - Fun Cartoonish Video about the Calculus Controversy - 7:46

9) I Will Derive - Fun Song Parody called I Will Derive - 3:16

10) Pi on Phineas and Ferb - Pies Recite the Number Pi on Phineas and Ferb - 0:17

11) Triangulation on Phineas and Ferb - a fun song about using triangles to find the height of a building - Triangulation - 0:44

12)  Systems of Equations Fox Trot Cartoon -

13)  Why Logarithms are Necessary Why Computer Colors Use Logarithms

[Contributions from Mrs. E Teaches Math, Doc Running, and Joan Kessler]

(If you have suggestions of things to add to this page, please leave them in the comments)